Positive results for Corella Relocation Program

City of Greater Geraldton Rangers Darren Cole and Neil Ferridge during the training for the Corella Relocation Program.

City of Greater Geraldton Rangers Darren Cole and Neil Ferridge during the training for the Corella Relocation Program.

City of Greater Geraldton Rangers have seen positive results in the aftermath of the recent Corella Relocation Program.

Last week over 1,000 firecrackers were let off over three days as the City trialled a new type of deterrent in a bid to relocate the masses of corellas from Geraldton.

City Rangers have said the operation has shown positive results and they believe they have reduced the presence of the birds in the Geraldton CBD and surrounding areas by an incredible 60 per cent.

City CEO Ken Diehm said it was now a waiting game as to whether the birds would return.

“We have won the battle but we are yet to see if we have won the war,” he said.

“The trial has proven to be a learning exercise for our team and we’ve had an extremely positive response from the community.

“Right now we are waiting to observe what the birds’ next move will be and we are looking at other methods and new technology to add to our arsenal.”

The City was forced to take action after the plague of birds had caused tens of thousands of dollars worth of damage to local infrastructure.

Controlling the plague proportions is in fact a State Government responsibility however the City was forced to take action due to the enormous number of complaints from local residents and businesses.

Specially developed firecrackers were let off in several places around the Geraldton CBD as well as Pass Street, the Geraldton Hockey Association and the Geraldton Turf Club.

Rangers have observed flocks of up to 15,000 corellas and they have spent a lot of time observing the species’ behaviour.

Rangers monitored the flight path of the birds once they were moved on and it was noted that they tended to move in a certain pattern, with several birds staying behind to ‘guard the roost’. After a few times, the birds became familiar with the Rangers and even recognised their vehicle when they pulled up to conduct the exercise.

A cluster of the birds have made the Geraldton Turf Club their home and the City is currently in discussions with the Turf Club regarding the Corella population at the sporting ground.

The City will continue to monitor the behaviour of the Corellas whilst looking into other methods and technology to ensure the birds stay clear of places within the City. 

Rangers believe that the Corella Relocation Program has reduced the presence of Corellas in Geraldton by 60 per cent.

Rangers believe that the Corella Relocation Program has reduced the presence of Corellas in Geraldton by 60 per cent.